Noticeboard

If you have had covid 19 vaccinations abroad and need a covid pass please click or copy the link below which will inform you how to do this :-

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/tell-nhs-about-coronavirus-vaccinations-abroad/

  

If you do not wish to receive your Covid vaccine, please contact the surgery in order that your medical records can be updated.

Whilst we are currently working in different ways, please remember that we are still here.  All requests for GP appointments will now be triaged by your doctor to assess the need to be seen.

COVID19 is unlikely to cause a serious illness in children, but please remember children can still become seriously unwell from other causes that are always around. Please do not let concerns over COVID19 stop you from contacting medical services. If you are not sure if your child needs to be seen please go to https://www.what0-18.nhs.uk/national for advice or contact 111 or your GP. For information about crying babies go to https://www.what0-18.nhs.uk/national If your child is severely unwell call 999 or go to ED.

Message from Martonside Medical Centre: Please note our surgery has restricted access, all contact must be by telephone in the first instance. Please DO NOT just turn up. This is to ensure the safety and protection of everyone. Thank you. 

 

 If the surgery is closed and you require urgent medical assistance which cannot wait until the surgery re-opens, please ring 111.

 

Calls to NHS 111 are free from both landlines and mobiles.

 If you have a life threatening medical emergency, please dial 999

X-Ray

doctor examining an x-rayAn X-ray is a widely used diagnostic test to examine the inside of the body. X-rays are a very effective way of detecting problems with bones, such as fractures. They can also often identify problems with soft tissue, such as pneumonia or breast cancer.

If you have a X-ray, you will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being X-rayed is between the X-ray tube and the photographic plate.

An X-ray is usually carried out by a radiographer, a healthcare professional who specialises in using imaging technology, such as X-rays and ultrasound scanners.

You can find out more about x-ray tests, how they are performed, their function and the risks by visiting the NHS Choices website.

 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website